I Was Born Free

"We're all one thing, Lieutenant. That's what I've come to realize. Like cells in a body. 'Cept we can't see the body. The way fish can't see the ocean. And so we envy each other. Hurt each other. Hate each other. How silly is that? A heart cell hating a lung cell." - Cassie from THE THREE
Posts tagged "Netflix"
F.A.I.L.

F.A.I.L.

I DO NOT WANT TO CHOOSE THE DISCS I WANT TO WATCH IT RIGHT NOW.

Oh, Netflix reviews of Salò.

Oh, Netflix reviews of Salò.

As part of that series I said I was going to start and then immediately forgot about, I am going to recommend a movie that is available to watch instantly on Netflix.
My choice is Fish Tank.
I know what you’re thinking: “Fish Tank? Sounds like a ripoff of Rabbit Hole!” But they’re actually totally different!!
Fish Tank came to me due to Netflix’s own relentless recommendation system. After months of being told that it was a movie with a Strong Female Lead, I finally noticed it was also a Criterion Collection movie (I am, after all, pretentious), so I hit play.
For those of you desperate to compare this to films from 2009 that were nominated for Best Picture, this movie is about 70% Precious and 30% An Education (thankfully, it is 0% The Blind Side).  Director Andrea Arnold portrays a side of life in the UK that we don’t usually get to see over here. Mia, played by Kate Jarvis in her first acting gig, is about as far as you can get from Bridget Jones or Edina Monsoon. Mia is a deeply broken human being. She’s a friendless teenager living in public housing with her younger sister and deadbeat mom. She fights and calls people cunts as cavalierly as you or I might eat breakfast and say schnauzer. As un-charming a character as she is, there is so much pain in her face that I can’t help rooting for her. Her one outlet seems to be hip-hop dancing (don’t worry, Mia doesn’t “stomp” her way out of poverty or anything).
The plot of Fish Tank starts when Mia’s maddeningly irresponsible mother brings home a new boyfriend, played by the alarmingly attractive Michael Fassbender.  He shows more interest in Mia and her sister than their mother ever has.  Mia doesn’t quite know how to deal with an adult who doesn’t scream curses at her.  
The story goes to some dark and uncomfortable places, but it does so honestly and naturally. Plus, it’s like, really juicy, so that kept me on the edge of my seat. Watch it!
Watch the trailer here.Watch the whole movie (if you’re a Netflix subscriber) here. 

As part of that series I said I was going to start and then immediately forgot about, I am going to recommend a movie that is available to watch instantly on Netflix.

My choice is Fish Tank.

I know what you’re thinking: “Fish Tank? Sounds like a ripoff of Rabbit Hole!” But they’re actually totally different!!

Fish Tank came to me due to Netflix’s own relentless recommendation system. After months of being told that it was a movie with a Strong Female Lead, I finally noticed it was also a Criterion Collection movie (I am, after all, pretentious), so I hit play.

For those of you desperate to compare this to films from 2009 that were nominated for Best Picture, this movie is about 70% Precious and 30% An Education (thankfully, it is 0% The Blind Side).  Director Andrea Arnold portrays a side of life in the UK that we don’t usually get to see over here. Mia, played by Kate Jarvis in her first acting gig, is about as far as you can get from Bridget Jones or Edina Monsoon. Mia is a deeply broken human being. She’s a friendless teenager living in public housing with her younger sister and deadbeat mom. She fights and calls people cunts as cavalierly as you or I might eat breakfast and say schnauzer. As un-charming a character as she is, there is so much pain in her face that I can’t help rooting for her. Her one outlet seems to be hip-hop dancing (don’t worry, Mia doesn’t “stomp” her way out of poverty or anything).

The plot of Fish Tank starts when Mia’s maddeningly irresponsible mother brings home a new boyfriend, played by the alarmingly attractive Michael Fassbender.  He shows more interest in Mia and her sister than their mother ever has.  Mia doesn’t quite know how to deal with an adult who doesn’t scream curses at her.  

The story goes to some dark and uncomfortable places, but it does so honestly and naturally. Plus, it’s like, really juicy, so that kept me on the edge of my seat. Watch it!

Watch the trailer here.
Watch the whole movie (if you’re a Netflix subscriber) here

I’ve decided that I am going to start periodically recommending movies that are available on Netflix Instant.

My first pick is Julia.

Julia is a thriller full of hijinks, debauchery and a disregard for the safety of children.  It is powered entirely by Tilda Swinton’s performance as the titular anti-hero, which is of the caliber of Day-Lewis in There Will Be Blood and DeNiro in Raging Bull.  Watching Julia perpetually lie her way though life is pure cinematic pleasure.

According to Box Office Mojo, Julia grossed $65,108 in the US, and in its widest release it was playing on four screens.  Netflix is pretty much the only reason that anyone has seen it at all.  It’s certainly how I found it.  Roger Ebert even boldly speculated in early 2010 that Netflix could pave the way for Tilda to earn a Best Actress nomination (this did not happen, and I cannot avoid mentioning that the award ultimately went to Sandra Bullock).  Read his four-star review of Julia here.

Most of the world has still not seen Julia, and it’s likely to stay that way.  A movie like this that’s kind of lacking a moral compass and would make any parent squirm is not necessarily going to find mass appeal.  Some (not me) would say it’s too long and the plot is outlandish.  Fair enough, but it deserves, to at least earn some kind of cult status.  

Watch the trailer here and watch the whole goddamn thing (if you’re a Netflix subscriber) here.

I sure did find this review of The Lost World: Jurassic Park helpful.

thedailywhat:

Big Deal of the Day: The Criterion Collection today announced that it has partnered with Hulu to make 150 of their titles available for instant streaming through Hulu Plus — a number that’s expected to climb rapidly.

From the official announcement:

Starting today, there are more than 150 of our most important films online on the Hulu Plus subscription service. Over the coming months, that number will swell to more than 800 films. For the true cinephile, this should be a dream come true. On Hulu Plus, you’ll find everything in our library, from Academy Award winners to many of the most famous films by art-house superstars like Ingmar Bergman, Akira Kurosawa, and Federico Fellini to films so rare that they have never been seen in the U.S. in any medium.

At $7.99 a month, Hulu Plus still doesn’t seem to make sense to a lot of people (mostly because the all-too-familiar ads don’t go away), but with the addition of such Criterion Collection classics as Yojimbo, The 400 Blows, and I Was a Teenage Zombie, perhaps a serious reconsideration is in order.

[criterion.]

I wonder if this will have much effect.  Is the Hulu audience really interested in Criterion movies?  And does the Criterion audience interested in Hulu?

And does this mean Criterion is pulling their movies from Netflix Instant?  That probably makes all the difference.

Netflix is getting ballsy (they were right though).

Oof.