I Was Born Free

"We're all one thing, Lieutenant. That's what I've come to realize. Like cells in a body. 'Cept we can't see the body. The way fish can't see the ocean. And so we envy each other. Hurt each other. Hate each other. How silly is that? A heart cell hating a lung cell." - Cassie from THE THREE
Posts tagged "Film"

A friend told me today that he saw a movie at Cobble Hill Cinemas and we immediately spent 5 minutes discussing the intro video there which is literally my favorite thing ever and I once bootlegged it and put it on youtube.

*edit: I noticed that someone else had bootlegged it and put it on youtube and investigated a little and realized it was SOMEONE I WENT TO HIGH SCHOOL WITH and now I feel a lot of things.

That “road to hell is paved with good intentions” saying seems pretty true lately.

2011 was a great year for movies! As good a year as I can remember. Of course, you would not know that from the Oscar nominations. It was a big year for death, revenge and mental illness. Sign me up!

I spent most of the year only seeing the movies that people wouldn’t shut up about. And then those movies turned out to be Super 8 and Drive. I’ve spent the past couple months furiously catching up, with a little help from sneaking around and whatever the exact opposite of SOPA is. Thus, I’m only now confident that I have seen all the movies I need to in order to make a proper top 10. Except there’s still lots that I need to see, especially documentaries and foreign films. But who among us can’t say they should see more documentaries and foreign films? Please note that my rankings are practically a formality. I will be giving numbers 9-1 five stars on Netflix (sorry, Pedro).

I’m putting the list behind a break so as not to infuriate people.

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nypl:

“WHAT IS SO SPECIAL ABOUT BASKIN!?!?” The beloved 1988 film BIG made us realize that Tom Hanks is awesome, Zoltar machines are dangerous, giant pianos can provide great exercise, and if MacMillan Toys was a real company it would be the coolest place to work. In other words the movie is a classic. The same cannot be said for the 1996 musical adaptation of the film that left many people saying: “I don’t get it.”

BIG: THE MUSICAL opened and closed quickly on Broadway in 1996 and has become largely forgotten. Well forget no more. We found in our collections at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts in our Billy Rose Theatre Division this original playbill. Can you say shimmy shimmy cocoa pop? 

True story: I saw this on Broadway.

thefinalimage:

Stalker, 1979 (dir. Andrei Tarkovsky)

The best.

thefinalimage:

Stalker, 1979 (dir. Andrei Tarkovsky)

The best.

Bannon dramatizes the theme of Palin’s persecution at the hands of her enemies in the media and both political parties, a notion the former governor has long embraced. Images of lions killing a zebra and a dead medieval soldier with an arrow sticking in his back dramatize the ethics complaints filed by obscure Alaskan citizens, which Palin has cited as the primary reason for her sudden resignation in July of 2009.
I don’t like Israel’s Palestinian policies. But I am not Mel Gibson. I am definitely not Mel Gibson. I am the opposite. I have been to all these concentration camps and I think that the Holocaust is the worst crime in humanity. And I was naïve. Coming from Denmark, I thought this was some time ago and we should open up a little. This was wrong. It was stupid of me and I apologize for the pain I have inflicted on some people. If anyone would like to hit me, they are perfectly welcome. I must warn you, though, that I might enjoy it. So maybe it’s not the right kind of punishment.
Lars Von Trier

The film, which begins shooting in June, is a long time coming; the script was finished in 2009 and then shelved before the recent movement. According to Variety, the first iteration centered on the relationship between The Master (Hoffman’s character) and Freddie (the lieutenant, to be played by Phoenix. “As the faith begins to gain a fervent following, Freddie finds himself questioning the belief system he has embraced, and his mentor,” the industry daily reported.

Whether this was originally part of the story or not, the new script has Hoffman as a shaken war veteran who creates the religion in the 50’s, which, according to Deadline, “catches on with other lost souls.”

L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology, served in the Navy in World War II, and following his post-war release from the hospital, founded the belief system in 1952.

Breathing into a paper bag.

#DYING

(via bobbyfinger)

As part of that series I said I was going to start and then immediately forgot about, I am going to recommend a movie that is available to watch instantly on Netflix.
My choice is Fish Tank.
I know what you’re thinking: “Fish Tank? Sounds like a ripoff of Rabbit Hole!” But they’re actually totally different!!
Fish Tank came to me due to Netflix’s own relentless recommendation system. After months of being told that it was a movie with a Strong Female Lead, I finally noticed it was also a Criterion Collection movie (I am, after all, pretentious), so I hit play.
For those of you desperate to compare this to films from 2009 that were nominated for Best Picture, this movie is about 70% Precious and 30% An Education (thankfully, it is 0% The Blind Side).  Director Andrea Arnold portrays a side of life in the UK that we don’t usually get to see over here. Mia, played by Kate Jarvis in her first acting gig, is about as far as you can get from Bridget Jones or Edina Monsoon. Mia is a deeply broken human being. She’s a friendless teenager living in public housing with her younger sister and deadbeat mom. She fights and calls people cunts as cavalierly as you or I might eat breakfast and say schnauzer. As un-charming a character as she is, there is so much pain in her face that I can’t help rooting for her. Her one outlet seems to be hip-hop dancing (don’t worry, Mia doesn’t “stomp” her way out of poverty or anything).
The plot of Fish Tank starts when Mia’s maddeningly irresponsible mother brings home a new boyfriend, played by the alarmingly attractive Michael Fassbender.  He shows more interest in Mia and her sister than their mother ever has.  Mia doesn’t quite know how to deal with an adult who doesn’t scream curses at her.  
The story goes to some dark and uncomfortable places, but it does so honestly and naturally. Plus, it’s like, really juicy, so that kept me on the edge of my seat. Watch it!
Watch the trailer here.Watch the whole movie (if you’re a Netflix subscriber) here. 

As part of that series I said I was going to start and then immediately forgot about, I am going to recommend a movie that is available to watch instantly on Netflix.

My choice is Fish Tank.

I know what you’re thinking: “Fish Tank? Sounds like a ripoff of Rabbit Hole!” But they’re actually totally different!!

Fish Tank came to me due to Netflix’s own relentless recommendation system. After months of being told that it was a movie with a Strong Female Lead, I finally noticed it was also a Criterion Collection movie (I am, after all, pretentious), so I hit play.

For those of you desperate to compare this to films from 2009 that were nominated for Best Picture, this movie is about 70% Precious and 30% An Education (thankfully, it is 0% The Blind Side).  Director Andrea Arnold portrays a side of life in the UK that we don’t usually get to see over here. Mia, played by Kate Jarvis in her first acting gig, is about as far as you can get from Bridget Jones or Edina Monsoon. Mia is a deeply broken human being. She’s a friendless teenager living in public housing with her younger sister and deadbeat mom. She fights and calls people cunts as cavalierly as you or I might eat breakfast and say schnauzer. As un-charming a character as she is, there is so much pain in her face that I can’t help rooting for her. Her one outlet seems to be hip-hop dancing (don’t worry, Mia doesn’t “stomp” her way out of poverty or anything).

The plot of Fish Tank starts when Mia’s maddeningly irresponsible mother brings home a new boyfriend, played by the alarmingly attractive Michael Fassbender.  He shows more interest in Mia and her sister than their mother ever has.  Mia doesn’t quite know how to deal with an adult who doesn’t scream curses at her.  

The story goes to some dark and uncomfortable places, but it does so honestly and naturally. Plus, it’s like, really juicy, so that kept me on the edge of my seat. Watch it!

Watch the trailer here.
Watch the whole movie (if you’re a Netflix subscriber) here

Job a little too much for you?

Job a little too much for you?

Boo-ya!

Boo-ya!

Fuck everybody.

Fuck everybody.